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QUOTE UNQUOTE COLLECTIVE (TORONTO)

MOUTHPIECE

BY: AMY NOSTBAKKEN and NORAH SADAVA

FEBRUARY 23, 2018 AT 8PM

VENUE: MARKET HALL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE, 140 CHARLOTTE ST, PETERBOROUGH

TICKETS: $23/$15 students, underwaged/$8 high school students

POST SHOW Q&A: Immediately following the show

For more information click here

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In conversation with...

Enjoy a series of interviews with artists by Estelle Jordaan

Emergency #20
Kate Story
An Emergency Neophyte speaks to Emergency Veteran Kate Story about the festival and what she’s created for it this year. Kate has had dance and performance work in at least 11 of the 19 past festivals. (Who can forget her collaborations with composer Curtis Driedger and full choir made to move about the stage in Emergencies 12 and 14?) Estelle moved to Canada from South Africa a number of years ago and recently settled in Peterborough.

2013 is the year that Public Energy will celebrate 20 years of Emergency.  The Emergency Festival showcases new works of performance by veteran and up-and-coming artists alike.  Sometimes the performances are outrageous, but mostly it is inventive, engaging and created by Peterborough artists working in a variety of performance fields.  “It is a cool festival and a great place to perform and experiment with new ideas” says Kate Story.  “For an artist who does not have a lot of money, it is an ideal opportunity to perform. And all the artists get a share of the box office revenue.”

Thinking back on the 19 previous Emergency festivals Kate has a problem identifying just one or two highlights. “Every year there is something MAGIC - a performance that really impresses or grabs your attention. Sometimes there are shows that aren’t very good – but at least people try. But, every year you can see repeat-artists getting better and new artists emerge.” 

And how does a performer get involved with Emergency?  You can either create your own piece, or you know someone who is creating a piece and ask them to get involved. 

Kate has been involved with quite a few festivals, and compliments Public Energy for their initiative to be open for anything, allowing artists not to be caught up in a huge tutorial processes, and not expecting artists to pay to take part in this annual event. She also expresses her gratitude to the people of Peterborough – “you always get a good and supportive audience to view your piece – that is great”.

This year the audience can expect a variety with Emergency.  There are indoor and outdoor performances, conventional and unconventional performances; acrobats, dancers, fire breathers and technological performances – something for everyone to enjoy. Kate is involved with two shows: Terror and Eerebus and Insomnia.

Terror and Erebus is a full length piece that will be performed outdoors on the Island Stage at Rotary Park on the Otonabee River. It tells the story of the Franklin Expedition to the Arctic in the 19th century with puppets of all sizes, masks and an Inuit throat singer. How can you not enjoy a performance where you can get cozy by the water’s edge on the blanket or light folding chair that you’ve brought to the show? 

Or join in on the AlleyWaltz Day where you start with the first show inside a theatre, Kate’s Insomnia, and then walk around downtown Peterborough from one performance site to another for about 60 minutes.  

Kate Story wrote and directed Insomnia.  She brings 3 musicians to perform with her and Ryan Kerr. People who have a good sense of humor will enjoy this performance. “I would just love it if a medical researcher or practitioner comes to see my show and talk to me afterwards on how they experienced it.”  And maybe there will be more insomniacs like myself, who will go and see this performance to see if Kate will also express a solution for all the “awake”-times that we share.

In my conversation with Kate I was curious about how she got started as a dancer. Kate recalls how - in the years when there was a funding structure that enabled performance tours throughout the country - she was taken to a ballet performance by her mother. Though she was only four years old at the time, she was enchanted by the expressive dancing of the main character. Her mother signed her up for ballet classes and with her first public performance she realized that she also loved all the other actions that happen backstage and in the wings.  Her love for the performing arts grew stronger and she started creating and directing her own theatre pieces casting her brother and friends in different roles.  “Unfortunately the adults weren’t always keen to come and see my shows” Kate laughingly confesses.

“I started creating my own solo pieces 15 years ago because female roles were very limited.  Everything comes out of my own body – and since I am an insomniac, I got very creative while I was thinking of a piece to celebrate with Public Energy this year.”

Public Energy is celebrating from May 8 – 12 with more than two dozen different performances inside local theatres and outdoor locations throughout downtown Peterborough.  For a more detailed schedule, click here…


The Wearable Art Show 2013

A newcomer to Public Energy speaks with some Wearable Art Show artists and organizers and give her own impressions about the show.

By Estelle Jordaan

D-day for the Wearable Art Show.
Ever wondered what happens before a show?  I arrived while rehearsals were still going on.  What can I say?  The theatre was a beautiful-thing-in-movement,  lighting technicians, loud-beat-thumping music, models on the runway exercising their moves and steps, auction items displayed to attract as many bids as possible.  And then I was grabbed by the arm and pulled to the computerized sound system.  “It is easy Estelle – you only need to click here to get the music going, here is where you turn up the sound and here you stop the music.  Please take over for the next 30 minutes”.  I start to shiver in my shoes – ELECTRONICS? ME? It can only go wrong …… and it did!!  And that was just the start of experiencing what happens before, during and after Public Energy’s Wearable Art show.

Of course I had to help out backstage, of course I was cast as a stage-hand, of course I had to take responsibility for something that had to do with lighting, of course I had to help out with the Silent Auction when the bidding closed, and of course I was constantly wondering how people kept track of what should happen and when it should happen.  I saw Lauren Paluck psyching up the young models from Strutt, I saw Janet Howse re-scheduling the order in which the outfits should be shown on stage and running around to ascertain that everyone knows about the changes, I saw Bill Kimball moving at quite a clip to get things done, I saw Liz Farrell moving amongst the models and directing them on stage, I saw Brad Brackenridge (right) whittling on a piece of wood and Lyall Brownlee (above) sketching so that their creations could be handed over as prizes in a lucky draw.

But, I also saw that creativity is alive and well in Peterborough.  An appreciative audience greeted all the outfits with enthusiasm.  I saw outfits that should be showcased on some of the reality shows that we see from time to time on television. I saw the energy backstage and on stage of the Dream Players (above right), the dramatic chanting of Nikolay Afonin (above left), the playful courting movements of David Russel and Alex Saul, the heartfelt performance of Melanie McCall, the chic outfits (above centre) created by Vicky Paradisis – oh I could just go on and on.  But all good things come to an end.  The Wearable Art show is over. The “thank you” cards are in the mail, the money is in the bank – so – what now?  Well – on 8 March 2013 it is CINQ HUMEURS, featuring some of Canada’s best dancers.  Click here for more information. 

And this whole article started with a simple question.
What the heck is wearable art?  And how does that become a popular runway project that old and young can enjoy?  As a middle aged woman, relatively new to Peterborough, I had to ask this question when I heard about the upcoming Wearable Art Show.  It is the annual fundraiser for Public Energy and will take place on Saturday, February 9th at 8pm at the Market Hall.  To get an answer to my questions, I spoke with some of the designers, models and sponsors. 
“Cable ties, pipe insulation, masking tape and oversized Christmas ribbon can create an ethereal outfit” according to Janet Howse, designer of the outfit sponsored by Rona Millwork.  “I want to tell a story of glory and ego and loss and the acceptance of our insignificance” says Janet. “I worked with Melanie McCall (left), she is a textile artist and my model, for about 20 hours to create this outfit”.

Well known artist Wendy Trusler “cannot ignore the chance to be creative and jumped at the opportunity to participate”.  She is bringing a female and male model to the show.  Alex Saul (right) and David Russell played the leads in the theatre show Hedda Gabler and she is reimaging this play in her outfits. Pammett’s Flowers is one of her favorite shops and they allowed her to wander around the store and see what she could use.  She saw a mat made of twigs and immediately knew she could use it.   David will be wearing a cape with plumes made of cedar and fresh flowers and birch bark spats.  Alex will be dressed in a hooped skirt created from weeds, moss and flowers with a bodice made with twigs, ribbon and ivy.  “My biggest challenge is to make the outfits with living materials like flowers.  This means that the outfits must be made just in time to ensure that it is still fresh for the show”.

How did Public Energy conceptualize this annual event?  Laurel Paluck, General Manager of Public Energy and also Master of Ceremonies, informed me that it started with an idea from Martha Cockshutt.  Public Energy was debating possible events that could be presented in Peterborough as a fundraiser.  Martha’s idea led to the first Runway Challenge.  Janet Howse suggested the addition of a wearable art section, lending from the Novia Scotia School of Art and Design that already had an annual wearable art show.

Another part of the upcoming show is the section where people can enter without sponsors.  When I spoke to some of the individuals who are creating outfits for the Wearable Art section of the show, I was amazed by their creativity and a sense of fun.

“The best way to bid adieu to the lowly penny for me was to make art” says Heidi den Hartog.  Heidi is a copper enamel artist and she created a penny ensemble with approximately 1800 pennies.  “My creation is a 1960’s inspired Mini-meets-Roman Warrior, with a bit of Victorian thrown in with a bustle and train”.

Hannah Spasov is a young woman who will soon start her studies in architecture.  To challenge herself she wants to create an outfit within 24 hours. To make it even more interesting, it will be created from metal collected from thrown away junk and paper-mâché.   Her friend Robyn Bull (left) will be her model and they both plan to incorporate their participation in their portfolios.




Two friends, Tori Silvera and Dan Legault decided to get involved after Bill Kimball, Artistic Director at Public Energy, handed out pamphlets about the show.  Tori were looking for ways to get more involved in the Peterborough community and participating in the Wearable Art Show looked like a fun way of doing it.  Dan is known as the ‘foodman’, Tori as the ‘photographer’ and Alexia Gezink (right) as the ‘model’.  Together they are planning to get the audience to eat/consume the outfit.  “It is all about the idea of consumption” states Tory.  Dan uses apples that he blends, spice up and then dehydrates to turn it into apple leather.  Tori will use the apple leather to design and create an outfit in a pixyish style with lots of edgy points.

Tammy Gibson is the Manager of Custom Copy and she is taking part in the Runway
Challenge as sponsor and also in the Wearable Art section by creating her own outfit made from paper, tape, stickers and staples.  “I will be environmentally friendly and only use scrap paper” she laughingly added “and I won’t overspend on my $25 budget”.   She sees her participation as “great fun and it might help me to figure out what my real interests are”.  Tammy’s model is Tianna Straatman (left).

The name should’ve told me what it was – but I still had to ask.  Strutt Central is a modeling agency representing actors and models.  They receive invitations on a regular basis to bring colour and pizzazz to a variety of events and fundraisers.  Christina Abbott, co-owner says that when they were asked to feature in the Wearable Art Show, they were thrilled to do it again.  The girls in the program were challenged to create outfits from recycled material.  This challenge will teach them to not cling to brand names and to be creative when shopping for clothes.  The girls are divided into 2 groups – juniors (8-12yrs) and seniors (13-15yrs).   But there are additional motivators for the girls while prepping for the Wearable Art Show.  “Moms and Grandmothers join the girls in making their outfits – and this leads to lots of family fun.  It also gives the models the opportunity to model their own outfit on the runway” says Christina.  More than 20 young girls will ‘strut’ down the runway in a variety of exciting outfits (right).  They will be joined by Christina in her own outfit, made from recycled lottery tickets and scratch cards.

Six months ago Liz Fennell opened The Gallery in the Attic on Hunter Street.  Climbing well-worn stairs to interview her, I find myself in a room full of old charm, where artwork from local artists and students are exhibited.  While talking to Liz, I cannot keep myself from looking around.  Various artworks are hanging on the walls; there are jewelry, paintings, exhibits from the students from Crestwood High School, prints, cards, pottery, and a darkroom-in-planning.  But I digress – Liz is just one of several volunteers with Public Energy that will be helping backstage at The Wearable Art Show.  “The art community in Peterborough is small and very supportive of one another.  I will be wearing multiple hats while backstage – but it will be fun” she enthused.  She got involved when she helped to coordinate volunteers with Dusk Dancing – one of the earlier events presented by Public Energy.

This is just amazing – like a smorgasbord of creativity.  The more I hear, the more intrigued I am.  Laurel Paluck, General Manager at Public Energy, enthusiastically claims “Peterborough has a rich artistic scene and The Wearable Art Show gives Public Energy and the community of Peterborough the opportunity to connect with visual and conceptual artists.”

I might not know what Faux-Fashion is, but I will definitely be at the Market Hall on Saturday night.  The show will be opened with a Black Light show, presented by a group from the Community Living Agency and conceptualized by Vicky Paradisis.  I want to see the more than 50 creations on the catwalk.  I want to see how Brad Brackenridge and Lyall Brownlee create works of art right before my eyes.  I am curious to see the 20 creations of Strutt Central; I want to put in my bid at the Silent Auction (which includes accommodation in a beautiful villa in Mexico) and a few other enticing items.  What can I say - I want to be part of the fun!

-Back to top-

 

estelletest

Thank you for supporting  Public Energy and The Wearable Art Show.  Please fill out this survey and drop it in a donation box.
oefening

 


 

Estelle's page

I am here to learn new tricks of working in Canada. This photo shows one of our creations, designed by Georgie and worn by Emma.

Another test

Thank you for supporting Public Energy and The Wearable Art Show. Please fill out this survey and drop it in a donation box.

 

The Wearable Art Show

Press Release

 

What the heck is wearable art? And how does that become a popular runway project that old and young can enjoy? As a middle aged woman, relatively new to Peterborough, I had to ask this question when I heard about the upcoming Wearable Art Show. It is the annual fundraiser for Public Energy and will take place on Saturday, February 9th at 8pm at the Market Hall. To get an answer to my questions, I spoke with some of the designers, models and sponsors.

 

“Cable ties, pipe insulation, masking tape and oversized Christmas ribbon can create an ethereal outfit” according to Janet Howse, designer of the outfit sponsored by Rona Millwork. “I want to tell a story of glory and ego and loss and the acceptance of our insignificance” says Janet. “I worked with Melanie McCall, she is a textile artist and my model, for about 20 hours to create this outfit”.

 

Well known artist Wendy Trusler “cannot ignore the chance to be creative and jumped at the opportunity to participate”. She is bringing a female and male model to the show. Alex Saul and David Russell played the leads in the theatre show Hedda Gabler and she is reimaging this play in her outfits. Pammett’s Flowers is one of her favorite shops and they allowed her to wander around the store and see what she could use. She saw a mat made of twigs and immediately knew she could use it. David will be wearing a cape with plumes made of cedar and fresh flowers and birch bark spats. Alex will be dressed in a hooped skirt created from weeds, moss and flowers with a bodice made with twigs, ribbon and ivy. “My biggest challenge is to make the outfits with living materials like flowers. This means that the outfits must be made just in time to ensure that it is still fresh for the show”.

 

How did Public Energy conceptualize this annual event? Laurel Paluck, General Manager of Public Energy and also Master of Ceremonies, informed me that it started with an idea from Martha Cockshutt. Public Energy was debating possible events that could be presented in Peterborough as a fundraiser. Martha’s idea led to the first Runway Challenge. Janet Howse suggested the addition of a wearable art section, lending from the Novia Scotia School of Art and Design that already had an annual wearable art show.

 

Another part of the upcoming show is the section where people can enter without sponsors. When I spoke to some of the individuals who are creating outfits for the Wearable Art section of the show, I was amazed by their creativity and a sense of fun.

 

“The best way to bid adieu to the lowly penny for me was to make art” says Heidi den Hartog. Heidi is a copper enamel artist and she created a penny ensemble with approximately 1800 pennies. “My creation is a 1960’s inspired Mini-meets-Roman Warrior, with a bit of Victorian thrown in with a bustle and train”.

 

Hannah Spasov is a young woman who will soon start her studies in architecture. To challenge herself she wants to create an outfit within 24 hours. To make it even more interesting, it will be created from metal collected from thrown away junk and paper-mâché. Her friend Robyn Bull will be her model and they both plan to incorporate their participation in their portfolios.

 

Two friends, Tori Silvera and Dan Legault decided to get involved after Bill Kimball, Artistic Director at Public Energy, handed out pamphlets about the show. Tori were looking for ways to get more involved in the Peterborough community and participating in the Wearable Art Show looked like a fun way of doing it. Dan is known as the ‘foodman’, Tori as the ‘photographer’ and Alexia Gezink as the ‘model’. Together they are planning to get the audience to eat/consume the outfit. “It is all about the idea of consumption” states Tory. Dan uses apples that he blends, spice up and then dehydrates to turn it into apple leather. Tori will use the apple leather to design and create an outfit in a pixyish style with lots of edgy points.

 

Tammy Gibson is the Manager of Custom Copy and she is taking part in the Runway Challenge as sponsor and also in the Wearable Art section by creating her own outfit made from paper, tape, stickers and staples. “I will be environmentally friendly and only use scrap paper” she laughingly added “and I won’t overspend on my $25 budget”. She sees her participation as “great fun and it might help me to figure out what my real interests are”. Tammy’s model is Tianna Straatman.

 

This is just amazing – like a smorgasbord of creativity. The more I hear, the more intrigued I am. Laurel Paluck, General Manager at Public Energy, enthusiastically claims “Peterborough has a rich artistic scene and The Wearable Art Show gives Public Energy and the community of Peterborough the opportunity to connect with visual and conceptual artists.”

 

I might not know what Faux-Fashion is, but I will definitely be at the Market Hall on Saturday night. The show will be opened with a Black Light show, presented by a group from the Community Living Agency and conceptualized by Vicky Paradisis. I want to see the more than 50 creations on the catwalk. I want to see how Brad Brackenridge and Lyall Brownlee create works of art right before my eyes. I am curious to see the 20 creations of Strutt Central; I want to put in my bid at the Silent Auction (which includes accommodation in a beautiful villa in Mexico) and a few other enticing items. What can I say - I want to be part of the fun!

 

 

l


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